Duck Lunge | BENJAMIN SIONG

Duck Lunge | BENJAMIN SIONG
Mar 20, 2018
by ASP Admin

Anyone who’s tried this lunge variation will probably attest to the deep burn in the VMOs that accumulates through the set … and I love it!

The duck lunge, appropriately named, is a one of my go-to lunge movements because this exercise emphasises several training attributes other lunge variations may not:

1) Having to keep my torso upright through the movement means reinforcing ankle, calf and hip flexors flexibility as well as mobility strength. This builds me up for a safe and strong deep squatting position.

2) The close stance in my movement also emphasises lumbo-pelvic stability and rhythm. While this should be innate, given how babies develop their walking and running patterns, our hip movements nowadays often tend to be disrupted and made faulty due to poor habits from our current activities (or rather lack of current activity).

3) The emphasis on just the deep bottom ranges of the lunge is crucial in the development of the muscles and tendons that stabilise the knee, especially the lower fibres of the VMO.

This is a more advanced exercise. If you’re thinking of giving this a go today, begin just with bodyweight, keeping upright posture and focusing on a smooth motion through the exercise.

Benjamin Siong
Founder & Strength Coach

Contact us today at www.trainasp.com.au/contact-us/ or call (03) 9038 8008 to book a consult with one of our trainers!

Hip Hinge: The Fundamental Movement | GEORGE MENELAOU

Hip Hinge: The Fundamental Movement | GEORGE MENELAOU
Mar 13, 2018
by ASP Admin

7 MAIN MOVEMENTS required per week to round out your program in ALL the fundamental movements of life.
1. Hinge
2. Squat
3. Lunge
4. Push
5. Pull
6. Carry
7. Gait

WHAT IS A HIP HINGE?
The Hip Hinge or Hinge Movement is a fundamental movement pattern involved in flexion and extension of the hip, this involves what we call the “Posterior Chain” muscles to act in unison in order to extend the hip. The muscles that are involved in a Hip Hinge, though not limited to this, are the erector spinae, lattissimus dorsi, trapezius muscles, quadratus lomborum, glute muscles, hamstring muscles, calves, rear deltoids, and rotator cuff. 

HIP HINGE EXERCISE VARIATIONS:
– Clean Grip BB Deadlift
– Snatch Grip BB Deadlift
– Sumo BB Deadlift
– Romanian Barbell Deadlift
– Deficit Deadlifts
– Rack Pulls
– Block Deadlifts
– Chain Deadlifts
– Resistance Band Deadlifts

– Deadlift Isometrics
– Sumo Stance Romanian Barbell Deadlift
– Romanian Dumbbell Deadlift
– Hex Bar Deadlifts
– Good Mornings
– Back Extensions
– Reverse Hypers
– Snatch Variations
– Clean Variations
– Kettlebell Swings

Just look at all of these exercises variations! These can all be easily manipulated with things like tempo, pauses, range adjustments, and 1 and 1/2 or 1 and 1/4 reps. A Bodybuilding Deadlift is very different to a Weightlifting Deadlift and THAT is also very different to a Powerlifting Deadlift.

The position for the first 3 deadlifts varies depending on a person’s goal, program, size, and levers. This will dictate start, mid and end position. How these exercises are used in programs is dependent on the client and their needs. Are they hypertrophy based, performance based or strength based?

MY TWO CENTS ON THE HIP HINGE:
a) It taxes the nervous system more than any other movement
b) It is normally done poorly due to weakness usually through hamstring muscles
c) Unlocking your hip flexors, activating your glutes and mobilising your spine will improve your lifts

Get to work!

Is going all in stopping your results? | PATRICK HAMMES

Is going all in stopping your results? | PATRICK HAMMES
Mar 4, 2018
by ASP Admin

When it comes to striving for a health, fitness or lifestyle goal, there’s one type of mindset that consistently stops people from achieving what they want: the all or nothing mindset. As the name suggests, you have two options: 1) you go all out and do everything you’re supposed to do, or 2) you don’t do any of it. There’s no grey area. Before I continue I want to say that sometimes, an all or nothing mindset can be beneficial. For example, if you’re an athlete or fitness competitor preparing for a competition you may need to go all out for a short period of time. Or, you may have an event (e.g. reunion, wedding, Stereosonic) and being stricter on your goals is necessary. But for the person looking for long term, sustainable health, and being happy with their body, then all or nothing thinking can keep you stuck where you don’t want to be.

All or nothing thinkers tend to pile on their to-do list and go 100% all out and remain 100% perfect for the entire duration. They will overhaul their entire diets, their routine, hit the gym X number of days a week, and make sure that this plan is executed to a T.

But what happens if an all or nothing thinker slips up? Well, for an all or nothing thinker, one slip up usually means game over. For the next few meals, day, or even days, it’s a free for all of pizza, chocolate, crisps, cake and some beverage that’s pretty good at cleaning coins. The thinking behind it is generally “well, I already messed up, so what’s the point?”

For some the thinking gets a little more extreme. I’ve come across individuals who refused to make ANY lifestyle changes (no matter how small) until their life circumstances (work, home life, etc.) allowed them to go all out. Of course, this never happens.

As you can probably imagine, all or nothing thinking has a pretty high failure rate, but only because it sets you up for failure from the start. Firstly, by tackling too many changes, it opens up a lot of room for error. If there’s one thing we know about habits, it’s that they can be extremely difficult to change. One habit alone can be a monumental task that requires long term diligence to break or recreate. Secondly, because all or nothing thinking demands perfection, and because no one can be perfect all the time, eventually you will slip up somewhere. It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when, and when it happens it’s usually wrought with feelings of guilt, stress and self-criticism.

In my experience, the people who succeed in the long term are people who understand that it’s not about doing everything perfectly, it’s about doing better. Better doesn’t mean better in a big way (at least not right away); it can mean being better by even the smallest step. For some people, the first step might be ‘get to the gym X number of times a week’. Forget about nutrition at this stage, it’s too much to handle right now. Once they achieve getting to the gym regularly then they can focus on something new. Maybe preparing home cooked dinners 3 times a week, instead of having takeaway. Once they master that, they could step it up to 5 or more nights a week. The point here is that the changes can be small and happen one at a time. There is no change that is too small as long the change is for the better. It is also much easier to succeed with a habit change when the change is small and easily achievable… and it’s empowering when you master the change and move on to a new one.

Probably the most important thing to remember for anyone looking to form healthy nutrition and lifestyle habits is that if you stray from the path once in a while, it’s okay! Focus on getting back on track as quickly as possible. However, if you do find yourself going off track too frequently, then maybe it’s time to re-evaluate the change. Perhaps choose another change or dumb down the current one (e.g. instead of “I will stretch every day” change it to “I will stretch 3 times a week). You’d be surprised, some changes will require other changes along the way. For example, doing more meal prepping may mean having to plan more grocery runs. That’s TWO changes in one!

If you think you’re an all or nothing thinker, it’s important to catch yourself out when you’re doing it. Changing a mindset is not always easy but being aware of how you think and the steps your mind takes can be half the battle won. At the end of the day, the main thing to remember is that perfection doesn’t exist, and trying to strive for it only breeds stress, anxiety and, in some cases, depression. As long as you are striving to do better—step by step—you will always know that you are heading in the right direction.

Patrick Hammes
ASP Coach

Contact us today at www.trainasp.com.au/contact-us/ or call (03) 9038 8008 to book a consult with one of our trainers!

Top 4 supplements for getting lean | MITCH MCKENZIE

Top 4 supplements for getting lean | MITCH MCKENZIE
Feb 27, 2018
by ASP Admin

One common question I get asked time and time again from friends and clients is which supplement is most important for fat loss and do I really need to supplement if I eat a healthy diet full of protein, fruits and vegetables?

Firstly, it must be understood that supplements are named so due to that fact that they are designed to ‘supplement’ not replace a nutritious diet. This means that you cannot expect a supplement to work effectively if you have not first managed factors such as total calorie intake and macronutrients (i.e you definitely cannot out-supplement a poor diet).

Although the following supplements will assist most of the general population to improve their body composition, the focus should always be primarily on structured eating and a well-designed fat loss training program.

Do you really need to supplement if you follow a healthy diet?

In today’s society, even with a diet full of whole foods, there are still nutrients that we probably lack. This is due to commercial farming methods of animals, fruits, and veg, increased pollution, and poor soil quality which in turn reduces the levels of vitamins and minerals in our food.

MAGNESIUM

Magnesium is a mineral that affects over 300 processes in the body and a deficiency can lead to an array of problems such as poor sleep, metabolic problems and stress.

  • Magnesium reduces the effects of cortisol by boosting the hormone DHEA
  • Magnesium reduces inflammation by boosting the immune system
  • Magnesium has a calming effect on the nervous system. If taken before bed, can improve sleep quality which will enhance recovery
  • Magnesium increases insulin sensitivity which is the key hormone involved in fat loss

FISH OIL (OMEGA 3)

Fish oil is an extremely anabolic supplement and is used by the body for many different health benefits. Since this article is strictly focused on fat loss, we will focus on those.

  • High intake of Omega 3s has been studied to show improvements in body composition by turning on fat burning genes in the body and turning off fat storing ones.
  • Omega 3s work to increase testosterone-cortisol ratio in the body which helps fight stress
  • Fish oil has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the body as inflammation is associated with fat gain and obesity.

VITAMIN D

Research shows that if you have low vitamin D, you will be more likely to be overweight and have less muscle mass.

  • Low Vitamin D levels lead to fat storage and increased inflammation in the body
  • Low Vitamin D levels influence insulin sensitivity in the body which increases risk of not only gaining weight but also risk of diabetes.
  • Research shows that men with adequate levels of vitamin D have higher levels of testosterone

ZINC

  • Zinc is critical for optimal hormone production, increasing healthy levels of testosterone and growth hormone, which help promote the development of muscle mass
  • Zinc also helps increase the muscle sensitivity to insulin
  • Zinc has super antioxidant effects, protecting the body against free radical damage which causes inflammation

Mitch McKenzie
ASP Coach

Contact us today at www.trainasp.com.au/contact-us/ or call (03) 9038 8008 to book a consult with one of our trainers!

Why you should never stop learning | KATHERINE GOFF

Why you should never stop learning | KATHERINE GOFF
Feb 22, 2018
by ASP Admin

University and tertiary education is no longer the be all and end all when it comes to being an industry leader. A qualification does not guarantee expertise, and experience is becoming much more valuable across all sectors.

Perhaps you are a personal trainer. You completed the basic courses to become certified and now you take short courses to keep your certification.

Constant learning is key, but more importantly, it’s important to understand who you are learning from, and whether they are teaching you quality content that has seen proven results. Why would you want to learn from a personal trainer or educator who does not walk the walk or has no experience? There are many courses available that are certified, but are you getting your money’s worth? At the end of the day, finding a quality company or educator with a wealth of knowledge and experience is worth the extra research, when you consider the impact on your own training, your business, and your client’s wellbeing.

Perhaps you are a client. You never knew that your personal trainer spends thousands of dollars every year to remain qualified and keep up with current research to ensure your progress and success.

Invest in a personal trainer who will invest in themselves. A winning bodybuilding competitor is not always going to know more or know how to apply knowledge more. Having said that, it is important to find someone who has applied and understands their own training methods. When finding someone who you trust with your health and fitness goals, you should be confident that they have had results with their clients and want the same for you. It may also be worthwhile educating yourself so that you have a solid foundation to keep you on track. There are plenty of courses available for the general population, and may even give you a foot in the door of the fitness industry…

Entry level personal training courses teach basic fitness instruction. If you want to go beyond and have a deeper understanding, studying exercise, nutrition, psychology, health, and business from industry leaders is key. If you are looking for courses in 2018, Australian Strength Performance has released the dates for the next few months of courses worldwide, and we are excited to be speaking at many conferences this year. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram for updates!

Katherine Goff
Marketing & Content Manager

Contact us today at www.trainasp.com.au or call us at (03) 9038 8008 to book a consult with one of our trainers!

5 Healthy Eating Guidelines For Beginners | SHARON LEE

5 Healthy Eating Guidelines For Beginners | SHARON LEE

Feb 11, 2018
by ASP Admin

 

 

When it comes to getting optimal results for yourself or for clients, specificity to training and nutrition always breeds the best results. That is, training and nutrition should always be specific to the person. But with everyone being their own individual person with individual needs it can be confusing to know what will work for one person and not another person. How many carbs can you have? Do you carb cycle? Will intermittent fasting work for you or will it mess up your hormones? What about if it fits your macros (IIFYM)? What macro portions should you have? Will taking fish oil help you lose fat like it did for person X?

You can ask a hundred questions and depending on what your goals are, there can be a hundred questions that you could look at. A professional athlete or a physique competitor will often need an expert to give them nutrition and lifestyle advice, but for most people, nutrition doesn’t need to be overly complicated. At the end of the day, nutrition is often quite simple for most people; it’s the daily habits and routines that complicate things.

Having said that, I do understand that not everyone aims to compete in a physique competition or join a sporting event. Some of you may have just decided to start your healthy lifestyle and are simply looking to hit the gym and clean up your food.

If you are a beginner just hopping on the fitness wagon and aren’t too sure where to start your nutrition, here are 5 healthy eating guidelines you can follow to make sure all your hard work in the gym pays off.

1. Don’t get caught up in what worked for someone else.

The first thing you should understand when it comes to healthy eating, is that no one diet is going to work for everyone. The diet that the fitness model on Instagram model raved about for months may not work for you. Track your diet and then make changes based on what works and what doesn’t work. Track and experiment until you find something that works for YOU.

2. Eat whole, natural foods.

Whether or not you believe in eating meat, dairy or grains, your diet needs to revolve around whole, natural foods. The more local and organically produced you eat, the better (but not completely necessary, cost can be a factor). Cut out processed food and foods with a hundred different ingredients that you can’t even pronounce. Cook as much as you can with whole foods.

3. Don’t fall for labels.

Just because something says “All-Natural,” “Low Fat,” or “Gluten-Free,” doesn’t mean it is healthy or good for you. Do not fall for labels that are just meant to sell you a product. Stick with whole, natural foods as much as you can and read the ingredient list to determine for yourself if something is healthy.

4. Keep it simple!

All too often we overcomplicate our diets. We get stuck on tons of small details when we don’t even have the main pillars of our diet set. Start with the basics. Then worry about the details. When we get bogged down in the details, we get overwhelmed and generally give up on our diet. Pick out a few healthy foods you enjoy and build your diet around them. Pick out recipes around these foods. Try to pick recipes that require many of the same ingredients so your grocery list is short and simple. Keep it simple but also learn to add in a little variety every once in a while to prevent you from falling into a rut with your diet.

5. Preparation is key.

When we aren’t prepared, we give ourselves an excuse to deviate from what we know we SHOULD be doing. Meal prep and planning are extremely important especially when starting a new healthy diet. The easiest way to be prepared is to cook meals that make more than one serving so that you have leftovers for later that week. Preparation is also key for when you travel and even plan to eat out. Decide ahead of time how you are going to eat. Are you going to “cheat?” Or are you going to stick to your diet? If you make up your mind ahead of time, you will have an easier time not deviating from your plan. A great way to prep for trips or meals out with friends is to look at the menus or at least know what your basic healthy options are when you dine out. The more you can prepare yourself for different situations, the better off you will be. Being happy with your decision is also key even if you aren’t completely prepared. If you do end up cheating, don’t regret it. Enjoy and get right back on track the next meal!

 

Sharon Lee
Operations Manager

 

Contact us today at www.trainasp.com.au or call us at (03) 9038 8008 to book in a consult with one of our trainers!

BONE BROTH BENEFITS AND RECIPE

BONE BROTH BENEFITS AND RECIPE | SHARON LEE
Jun 21, 2014
by ASP Admin

I first heard about bone broth when I first moved to Australia three years ago and I’ve got to say, now I’m hooked! I make them throughout the year but I enjoy having them especially during winter! If you aren’t already making bone broth regularly, I’d encourage you to start today! It is an incredibly healthy and very inexpensive addition to any diet and the homemade versions beat store bought broth in both taste and nutrition 😀

The benefits of bone broth are infinite and some of the biggest natural benefits of adding bone broth into your primal diet are:

1. Joint Health:

Bone broth reduces joint pain and inflammation courtesy of chondroitin sulfates, glucosamine, and other compounds extracted from the boiled down cartilage.

2. Better Digestion:

The gelatin found in bone broth is a hydrophilic colloid that attracts and holds liquids, including digestive juices, thereby supporting proper digestion.

3. Rich in Minerals:

Bone broth contains high amounts of calcium, magnesium, and other nutrients that play an important role in healthy bone formation

4. Helps with leaky gut and inflammation:

The gelatin in bone broth protects and heals the mucosal lining of the digestive tract and helps aid in the digestion of nutrients whereas the amino acids such as glycine, proline, and arginine in bone broth all have anti-inflammatory effects.

Bone Broth Recipe:

Ingredients

4 lbs beef bones

12 cups water

2 T apple cider vinegar

1 medium onion, roughly diced

1 1/2 cups chopped carrots

1 1/2 cups chopped leeks

3 bay leaves

3-5 spring fresh rosemary

6 cloves garlic

Instructions

  1. Place bones in a pot or a crockpot, add apple cider vinegar and water, and let the mixture sit for 1 hour so the vinegar can leach the mineral out of the bones.
  2. Add more water if needed to cover the bones.
  3. Add the vegetables and bring to a boil. Skim the scum from the top and discard.
  4. Reduce to a low simmer, cover, and cook for 24-72 hours (if you’re not comfortable leaving the pot to simmer overnight, turn off the heat and let it sit overnight, then turn it back on and let simmer all day the next day)
  5. Let the broth cool and strain it and add sea salt to taste and drink the broth as is or store in fridge up to 5 to 7 days.

To use a slow cooker, you will need to first bring the broth to a boil in a pot on your stove, then skim the scum off the top. Pay careful attention to this stage, as once the broth begins to boil the scum is rolled right back into the broth. The scum are the impurities that you want to remove. You can then transfer the broth to your slow cooker and turn it on to low heat for 24 to 72 hours.

Enjoy!

THE PALEO DIET – STONE AGE NUTRITION OR FAD?

THE PALEO DIET – STONE
AGE NUTRITION OR FAD?
March 8, 2012
by ASP Admin

Sounding like something straight out of the Flintstones, the Paleolithic (“Paleo”) diet is the original diet designed keep us lean, strong and healthy. As its name suggest, this diet is essentially derived from the types of foods our ancestors consumed during the Paleolithic Age, spanning from about 2,600,000 years ago to about 10,000 years ago. While the availability of certain foods depended largely on factors such as geographic location, climate conditions and seasonal changes, each Paleolithic diet shared several similarities in common:

Firstly, the vegetable components did not include grain and grain products, but mainly consisted of non-starchy wild fruits and vegetables, dairy, and consisted mainly of meat from wild animals, which bore a completely different amount of fatty acid composition to our modern day domestic animals.

Secondly, the non-vegetable components excluded any dairy, and consisted mainly of meat from wild animals, which bore a completely different amount of fatty acid composition to our modern day domestic animals.

Third and perhaps most obviously, the Paleolithic diet excluded processed foods and refined sugar (apart from honey). As a result, the diet could be characterised as high in protein and fibre, and low in carbohydrates.

Now this begs the questions: what makes a 2 million year old diet still relevant in today’s society?

According to science, our genetic structure determines our optimal nutritional needs, and this has evolved according to the environmental conditions in which our ancient ancestors lived, including the foods they ate. The latest research has shown that our genes have only evolved between 0.01-0.02% since our ancestors in the Paleolitic age, leaving us (yup, you guessed it) between 99.8%-99.9% similar to how humans were 2 million years ago! Yet even though our genetic profile has remained largely unchanged, our human diet has drastically drifted away from that of our ancestors. Mass agriculture and industrialisation have introduced numerous grain, refined sugar and salt, dairy products, as well a plethora of processed and artificial foods as a regular part of the human diet.

In other words, many of us are not eating the foods we are genetically and physiologically adapted to eat. The food which we are fuelling our bodies with is therefore not in sync with the fuel our bodies need – much like fuelling an unleaded car with diesel. This resulting discordance has been accused as being a fundamental cause for many of our modern “first world” diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancers, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, heart disease, auto-immune diseases, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s and a host of other conditions that originally were unknown to our Paleolithic ancestors.

Ironically, some of the unhealthiest foods in today’s diet is being promoted and recommended to us by health organisations and nutritionists, and some of the foods which we were made to consume are rejected as unhealthy. Things like saturated fat, cholesterol and red meat – types of foods that humans are actually genetically designed to consume – often come attached with a “eat only in moderation” label. Yet what we should really be eliminating in our diet are grain products, excess sugar, hydrogenated vegetable oils, legumes and homogenised and pasteurised dairy, some of which are at the very base of the universal food pyramid (an out-of-date diet concept still widely accepted in Australia).

If your goal is to stay lean, healthy and natural, here are my 6 Top Tips to maintaining a successful Paleo Diet:

Be generous in having ANIMAL PROTEIN through the day
Organic if possible, as this will contain less toxins, preservatives and hormones. This includes:

  • Red meat and game (Beef, pork, lamb, veal, rabbit, goat, sheep, kangaroo, deer), including their organs (liver, kidney, bone marrow). Don’t be scared to eat the fatty cuts if they come from a well-treated animal and all meals with proteins should contain fat as well. Preferably choose pasture-raised and grass-fed meat coming from a local, environmentally conscious farm.
  • Poultry and eggs (chicken, wild turkey, pheasant, duck, quail, goose)
  • Wild caught fish (Salmon, tuna, trout, bass, halibut, sole, haddock, turbot, walleye, tilapia, cod, flatfish, grouper, mackerel, anchovy, herring)
  • Shellfish (Crab, lobster, shrimps, scallops, clams, oysters, mussels)

Have lots of fresh NON STARCHY VEGETABLES.
These include:

  • Non leafy vegetables (Celery, tomatoes, bell peppers, chilies, onions, garlic, leeks, kohlrabi, green onions, eggplants, cauliflower, broccoli, asparagus, cucumber, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, artichokes, okra, avocados, zucchini, mushrooms)
  • Leafy vegetables (Lettuce, spinach, collard greens, kale, beet top, mustard greens, dandelion, swiss chard, watercress, turnip greens, seaweeds, endive, arugula (rocket), bok choy, rapini, chicory, radicchio)
  • Root vegetables (Carrots, beets, turnips, parsnips, rutabaga, sweet potatoes, radish, jerusalem artichokes, yams, cassava, pumpkin, ginger)
  • Herbs (Parsley, thyme, lavender, mint, basil, rosemary, chives, tarragon, oregano, sage, dill, bay leaves, coriander)

Moderate your intake of FRUITS AND NUTS.
Bear in mind that while fruits are high in antioxidants and vitamins, the way a lot of store bought fruits are being cultivated and stored nowadays cause them to be extremely high in sugars and almost devoid of nutrients. Therefore aim to eat mostly fruits low in sugar and high in antioxidants like berries as well as nuts high in omega-3 or low in omega-6 like macadamia nuts and almonds. Here are some examples:

  • Fruits (berries, strawberry, cranberry, cranberry, blueberry, blackberry, grapefruit, peaches, nectarines, plums, pomegranates, pineapple, papaya, grapes, cherries, apricot, honeydew melon, kiwi, lemon, lime, mango, tangerine, coconut, figs, dates, passion fruit).
  • Raw nuts and Seeds (pistachios, brazil nuts, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds (pepitas), pecans, walnuts, pine nuts, macadamia nuts, chestnuts, cashews, almonds, hazelnuts).

Minimise (or eliminate) CEREALS, GRAINS AND LEGUMES.
While there are certain cultures that have adapted better to consuming these foods, humans as a species have only been eating grains (refined or whole), since the beginning of mass and industrialised agriculture some 10,000 years ago. Since our genes and the make-up of our digestive system was formed long before the advent of industrialisation, grains remained structurally and chemically different to the foods which the human body had already grown accustomed to eating. Unlike birds, which have a digestive system adapted to dealing with grains and seeds, our bodies are simply not made to effectively break down these forms of carbohydrates. These include:

  • Grains (wheat, rye, barley, oats, corn, rice, soy)
  • Legumes (peanuts, kidney beans, pinto beans, navy beans and black eyed peas).

Eliminate PROCESSED SUGAR
In nature, sugar almost always coexists with fats, protein, minerals and vitamins. By segregating sugar, like white sugar, we are in fact feeding our bodies a foreign substance, something that it cannot breakdown completely and will eventually interpret this as a poison. This includes:

Sugar products (sweets, soft drinks, all packaged products and juices including reconstituted fruit juices). As a rule of thumb, if it comes pre-packaged in a can, bag or box, don’t eat it!

Eliminate HOMOGENISED AND PASTEURISED DAIRY PRODUCTS
With the exceptions of organic butter and maybe heavy cream. Some cultures have successfully adapted well to dairy and its products, but this represents only 30% of the population, and more often than not, they have access to raw diary from organically grown grass-fed cows (not genetically modified cows selected for increased milk production, nor grain-fed cows). For those of us that may not get such high quality raw diary, then be aware that homogenisation and pasteurisation kills the good cultures and enzymes in milk that many of us need when consuming diary.

CELEBRITY DIETS – WHICH WORK BEST FOR YOU?

CELEBRITY DIETS – WHICH
WORK BEST FOR YOU?
February 14, 2012
by ASP Admin

“Diets, Diets, Diets.” That seems to be the hot topic on everyone’s lips leading up to summer. Alas, the annual quest for a toner, leaner, more defined physique begins, but with the vast amount of information on dieting, nutrition and looking good, which ones actually work? Let’s take a look at three popular diets and find out what exactly makes a diet work for you.

ATKINS DIET

The Atkins Diet has been widely popularised because of the rapid changes dieters see in their weight. The diet works by switching your body into a state of ketosis, using fat as the main source of energy instead of carbohydrate, thus inducing drastic weight loss. Dieters follow a regimented 4-stage eating plan. The first stage is a two-week induction phase where only fats, meats and certain cheeses are allowed, and starchy carbohydrates, fruits, nuts and legumes are kept to an absolute minimum. Following which, selected carbohydrate portions are gradually increased with each subsequent phase, and done so until the desired weight is achieved.

Celebrities who have been on the Atkins Diets include Halle Berry, Sarah Jessica Parker, Cameron Diaz, Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt.

The Pros:

  • Good for people who are pre-diabetic and those with type II diabetes.Works well for people who are overweight and need to lose fat fast. Great for meat lovers, given that it is a high fat, high protein diet.

The Cons:

  • Weight loss in the first week or so is mostly due to water loss from the body.
  • It is non- sustainable in the long term.
  • Depravation from carbohydrates can cause one to ‘rebound’, and over indulge in sweets when getting off the diet. (So don’t be surprised when you are heavier than when you first got on the diet!).
  • While it allows for unlimited saturated fat, it does not specify the need for organic saturated fats. The increasing incidence of heart disease and high cholesterol nowadays is due to the accumulation of trans-fats, plastics, chemicals and stress hormones in non-organic animal fats.
  • High amounts of protein at any one time can also increase insulin (the storage hormone) secretion substantially, causing fat to be stored instead of lost.

SOUTH BEACH DIET

Founded by Arthur Agatston, MD, the South Beach Diet has had a following of big names such as Oprah Winfrey, Bill Clinton, Jessica Alba, and our very own Nicole Kidman. This diet is based on the theory that cutting out ‘bad’ fats and carbohydrates will help your body lose weight and be less susceptible to heart disease, thus helping you become healthier and slimmer.
Unlike the Atkins, the South Beach Diet does not restrict carbohydrate portions per se, but emphasizes the use of ‘good’ low glycemic (GI) carbohydrates ( carbohydrates that do not cause a sudden spike in our blood sugar levels) over ‘bad ’ high GI ones, such as highly processed foods, sweets and soft drinks. It also distinguishes between ‘good’ unsaturated fats and ‘bad fats’ like saturated fats and trans fat, both of which is believed to increase in the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. The diet is divided into three different phases all of which include specific allowable foods, meal plans and recipes.

The Pros:

  • Ideal for people who want a rough outline on nutrition rather than a structured program.
  • The focus on ‘good’ and ‘bad’ carbohydrates has been found to decrease the risk of heart disease, lower blood pressure and help with type 2 diabetes.
  • Carbohydrates are not cut out completely, but are substituted by ‘good’ low GI carbohydrates.
  • There is no need to count calories or weigh foods on this diet.

The Cons:

  • The diet can be a slippery slope for carbohydrate addicts, as no clear guidelines about portion sizes or grams are given. This is left open to the dieter’s interpretation and may lead to overeating.
  • Focusing on the Glycemic index (GI) can be rather misleading and cannot be taken as an absolute indication for healthy living. For example, French fries have a lower GI than baked potatoes, but that does not mean it is a healthier option.


ZONE DIET

Created by Dr Barry Sears, the Zone Diet was not originally intended for weight loss diet but in fact, had an initial focus of decreasing heart disease. The diet focuses on the consumption of a correct ratio of food groups, in particular each meal should comprise of 40% carbohydrates: 30% protein: 30% fat. By keeping to this optimal ratio, our body’s sugar and fat storage hormone – insulin, will not be over secreted at any one time. This means reduced inflammation, more sustained energy, a better metabolism and the best part of all, the weight falls off. Celebrities including Madonna, Demi Moore, Ben Stiller and Jennifer Aniston have all claimed success with the Zone diet.

The Pros:

  • Places a focus on lean protein and ‘good cholesterol’ which is healthy for your heart.
  • No specific foods are forbidden, thus giving the dieter a wider variety to choose from.

The Cons:

  • While an ideal ratio is specified, the total amount of food to be consumed within each meal is not. Eating large quantities, despite keeping a ratio does not make it healthy to the waistline!
  • The Zone can be time consuming as food has to be prepared in a fixed proportion. Inconvenience can often deter dieters from reaching their goals.

While all 3 celebrity diets are helpful in losing weight in their own right, dieters often cannot sustain the results of the diet, leading them to put on more weight than when they first started. Oprah, for instance, has been on almost every diet known to man, only to see her weight ‘yo-yo’ up and down. This is known as the ‘rebound effect’. The stricter the diet and the more emotional suppression the dieter goes though, the larger the rebound effect. Frequent yo-yoing also impairs the proper functioning of the thyroid gland (this is the centre that regulates our metabolism), and leads to drastic weight gain.

Diets may work better for one individual over another. This highlights one fundamental truth – that we are all different in body chemistry and physical structure, and therefore have different nutritional requirements. Unless we are eating what our body really needs, it is not going to be helpful to our weight nor health in the long run. Severely low calorie diets have also been shown to increase cortisol (a stress hormone), causing abdominal fat and muscle breakdown.

So if you really what to shed those nasty kilos and keep it off for good, make sure to give these tips a go:

1. Make eating healthy a lifestyle, not a temporary band-aid.
A Diet (Pronounced ‘die-it’) as its name suggest, is a means to an end. By making a lifestyle choice to nourish your body with healthy produce, you will keep that weight off for good.

2. Stop counting calories!
While calories do have a part to play in the dietary equation, they also discount the importance of other elements in foods such as vitamins, mineral and phytochemicals. These are essential for maintaining the optimal health of our bodies as well as facilitating the absorption of nutrients, without which our bodies breakdown and are more susceptible to disease.

3. Do not just focus on weight loss.
Often initial dietary weight loss can be due to the loss of water (not fat, as you would be led to believe!). Learn to rely on other signs such as how your clothes fit, muscle tone and overall fitness levels.

4. Specific foods stimulate specific hormonal responses.
For instance, while pound for pound carbohydrates have the same calorie count as protein; it stimulates insulin more than any other food! Insulin is a storage hormone that is responsible for reducing blood sugar and storing fat.

5. Aim to have protein in every meal.
Protein sources such as meat, fish and eggs not only increases the satiety of the meal, keeping you fuller for longer, but also increases your metabolic rate. In fact, having protein in the morning has been found to stimulate neuro-peptide Y, a neurotransmitter manufactured in the gut which is responsible for feelings of motivation. Thus a good hearty breakfast sets you up for the day and can help you make better decisions.

6. Stick to nature.
Because our bodies are organic, it is best suited to handle foods that are natural. Unprocessed, organic foods contain a higher amount of vital nutrients and are not adulterated with artificial chemicals and pesticides. By opting for fresh organic produce as often as you can, you will ensure that your body has the nutrition it needs for optimal living.

7. Stay off packaged, canned and preserved foods.
Such foods are known to contain large amounts of xeno-estrogens and ‘plastic- like’ molecules which our bodies are unable to breakdown. According to Renowned Strength Charles Poliquin, our inability to detoxify such estrogens effectively often results in fat storage specifically around the thigh and hamstring region.

8. Eat fat to burn fat.
Due to our diets of modern foods, our bodies severely lack omega-3, an essential unsaturated fatty acid. Omega-3s contribute to the optimal functioning and integrity of all our cells. A high quality fish-oil such as Poliquin or Nordic Naturals is regulated by the highest standards in the industry and can provide a much needed supplementation our diets. The benefits of increasing our Omega-3 intake include weight loss, improvement of cognitive ability, and overall cell health.

9. Eat and enjoy your foods slowly.
Taking time to chew and taste the flavours, will not only promote better digestion, it will also ensure that you do not overeat.

10. Exercise with weights.
Research has found that you would reach your maximum weight loss potential after only 6 weeks of continuous aerobic cardio (that’s right, all those extra miles on the treadmill won’t do you any good), and in fact, can make you fat around the belly region. By using weights, you are building lean muscle tissue. Every extra pound of muscle actively tones your figure and burns an extra 70 calories a day!