1 1/4 WALKING LUNGE | MITCH MCKENZIE

1 1/4 WALKING LUNGE | MITCH MCKENZIE
Jun 21, 2017 
by ASP Admin

 

 

Squatting and Lunges with knees past toes?

If your trainer tells you not to let your knees travel past your toes when squatting or lunging ask them why… Common answers being it is ‘bad for the knees’.

 

  • The highest compressive force on the knee is actually at 90 degree of flexion when squatting to parallel.

 

  • When you keep the knees behind toes, the greater the flexion at the hip leading to more stress at the low back (ie bending foward)

 

  • The knee travels foward past the toe every time you walk up/down stairs.

 

  • In Australia we sit down all day at work all day and sit down to 💩rather than squatting like in most asian countries which limits our normal Range of movement or ability to squat all the way down

 

  • Olympic weightlifters push their knees over their toe in every lift and have one of the lowest rate of knee injuries. * With the exception of some injuires and variations of powerlifting style squatting.

(This video shows a 1 1/4 style walking lunge in where the knee travel forward each rep & the hamstring contacts the calf placing more stress on the Vastus Medialis)

Contact us today at www.trainasp.com.au or call us at (03) 90388008 to book in a consult with one of our trainers!

CLIENT PROGRESS

CLIENT PROGRESS | GEORGE MENELAOU
Jun 21, 2014
by ASP Admin

In my book progress is progress no matter how big or small. Chris a father of two, we embarked on a decision that being super shredded was not a priority, getting healthier, looking and feeling better and getter stronger was No. 1 on the list but most of all keeping up with his kids after a long day of work as a Carpenter.

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So what we did:

1) Improve Gut Health by introducing Kefir, Super Greens, removing Milk, removing high Insulin Loading Carbs

2) Introduce more whole protein sources, eggs, chicken, fish, Kangaroo, fish like Salmon, barramundi, rockling.

3) Upper Fibrous carbs such as Broccoli, Spinach, Kale, Cauliflower

4) Reduce Starchy carbs such as Pasta, white rice, breads

5) Introduce more Fats such as butter, Olive Oil, nuts, fish

6) Create a better understanding of sleep and its benefits and improve from 5-6 hours to 6-7 hours of sleep

All this is aimed at improving on a lifestyle that is already overly stressed by making small changes on a weekly basis.

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Training for Conditioning and Strength was a key factor to training.

Phase 1 we improve muscular imbalances

Phase 2 aim for Fat Loss and Hypertrophy

Phase 3 was a base introduction into stricter Hypertrophy

Phase 4 aim was Functional Hypertrophy to get stronger

Something that is quite common is parents not having the energy to keep up with their young and energetic children. At @trainasp we aim to improve somebody’s quality of life in some way whether it’s sleep, gut health, nutrition, strength, fat loss, gaining muscle, all geared to improving someone’s lifestyle.

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A minimum of 2 but a maximum of 3 training sessions were performed every week over this period. Strength went up tremendously, the ability to consciously activate muscles improved, and Chris got leaner as well. By the end he deadlifted over 100kgs as well. Fantastic work mate!

 

MUSCLE HYPERTROPHY | HOW TO GROW MUSCLE EFFECTIVELY!

MUSCLE HYPERTROPHY | HOW TO GROW MUSCLE EFFECTIVELY!
April 24, 2014
by ASP Admin

What are the key factors we look at during training and program writing when looking at Muscle Hypertrophy (what causes muscle to grow)?

As always with these topics they are likely to generate questions and queries, so please feel free to Contact Us or post your questions, feedback, and experiences on our Facebook Page.

1. Mechanical Tension

It is unclear at what percentage of your 1RM you should work with in order to maximise muscle growth but it is best to work with different loads, as an example 85% of 1RM, or 70% of 1RM. It can vary and should always change every month. Time under tension also comes into this factor as you want to stimulate different fast and slow twitch muscle fibres for maximal growth.

2. Metabolic Stress

Is the cause of Metabolite build up normally due to mid to high rep exercises as your body gets into the breakdown of glucose for fuel. Metabolic stress can drive Hypertrophy and drives great Fibre recruitment and cell swelling.

3.Muscle Tear/Damage

Micro tears caused by muscle damage due to the stretch position and full range of motion.

These are factors of training, mechanical tension and TUT determines rep ranges, outside of training we can look to Nutrition and sleep for muscle growth.

Strength such as Powerlifting, speed strength such as Weightlifting and Functional Hypertrophy training are great ways of strengthening your body to give you the ability to put on muscle when getting back to Hypertrophy ranges.

5 Tips To Get You Squatting Deeper

5 TIPS TO GET YOU
SQUATTING DEEPER
April 24, 2014
by ASP Admin

Following our recent post discussing the benefits of squatting squat ‘arse to grass’ we have here a much-needed follow up post providing five tips for HOW you can perform such an essential, but somewhat difficult exercise, and safely. As always with these topics they are likely to generate questions and queries, so please feel free to Contact Us or post your questions, feedback, and experiences on our Facebook Page.

1. Stretch Your Calves

Often the main reason you may not able to go deeper in your squats is tight calves. Try loosening up your calves using an isometric stretch on a leg press – holding each stretch at the lowest position for a minimum of 20 seconds and changing the position of your feet from pointing inwards, neutral and outwards.

2. Elevate Your Heels

By elevating your heels on a platform, you shorten the calf muscles and push the knees forward. This allows your body to be kept more upright as you move deeper into the squat, and also has the added advantage of making the squat a more quad dominant exercise.

3. Stretch Your Lower Back

A tight lower back can often cause your back to round as you descend into the squat, putting unnecessary stain on the lumbar erectors. Performing supine windmills beforehand can help loosen the back muscles, facilitating a deeper and more effective squat.w to get a better night’s sleep! In the meantime, sleep tight!

4. Widen Your Stance

Place your feet slightly wider than your hips, and turn your feet slightly (10-15 degrees) outwards. This creates a greater degree of movement for the femur (thigh bone), at the hip joint, allowing you to squat past a ‘parallel thigh’ position. Anatomically, this position tends to be more ‘natural’ and further activates the strong gluteal muscles, enabling you to lift a heavier load with increased stability.

5. Squat With Chains

Using training aids like chains are useful not only in overloading the squat at the top, but also assisting in deepening the range of movement at the bottom of the exercise.

Squatting Arse To Grass– Why Should We Do It?

SQUATTING ARSE TO GRASS
– WHY SHOULD WE DO IT?
April 7, 2014
by ASP Admin

All too often we are taught to limit our squatting to just below parallel rather than perform full ‘arse to grass’ squats, because it is a ‘safer alternative’. The main argument being that a full squat places a lot more stress on our knees and ligaments.

While from a static anatomical standpoint, this argument is seemingly true, our body actually behaves different in a dynamic movement under load. For example, supporting structures like cartilage and ligaments work to dissipate the intensification of stress on joints. On sensing the increased load, stretch receptor cells in the joint alert the brain to increase the muscular and ligamentous stability in and around the joint capsule, thus preventing injury.

There are circumstances a full squat would not be initially advised, such as for individuals with disintegrated or damaged knee cartilage, post knee operation patients, or individuals with disc bulges or spinal issues. In the majority of clients with knee issues though, it is ironically their years of half squatting, poor technique and the lack of full squatting that forms the root of their problem.

The Benefits

So, if a full Range Of Motion (ROM) squat is not bad for us, what exactly are the advantages of performing such an exercise?

  • Recent research has shown that full ROM squats help to strengthen the ligaments around the knees, and maintain the capsule integrity.
  • Squatting through a full range of motion helps to minimise imbalances of the quadriceps muscles by forcing the muscles to work through the lower half of its movement capacity, as well as reduce imbalances between the quadriceps and hamstrings.
  • It encourages optimal muscle recruitment and activation over a larger range of motion, leading to better quadriceps development.
  • Deep squatting helps to activate the lower fibers of the Vastus Medialis Oblique (VMO), which serve a critical purpose of stabilizing the knee during movements like running and jumping.
  • Full squatting is an instinctive movement pattern of the body, like walking or breathing. For example, perfect squatting techniques are best observed in children, who perform the exercise with ease and without instruction.
  • It can help to eliminate knee pain caused by patella-femoral tracking syndrome which ironically can be caused by muscular imbalances and tight iliotibial band as a result of partial squatting.